Jorge La Ferla program | IBERO-AMERICAN AUDIOVISUAL TERRITORIES

Edgar Endress (Chile) | Como hacer llover, 10´
Andrés Denegri (Argentina) | Uyuni, 2008, 8´18´´
Diego Lama (Peru) | The Act, 2012, 3´36´´
Claudia Aravena Abughosh (Chile) | Once de septiembre, 2002, 5´30´´
Alfredo Salomón (México) | Tensa Calma, 2008, 8´31´´
María Paz Encina (Paraguai) | Familiar, 2014. 9´
Gerardo Suter (Argentina/México) | Caja Negra, 2017, 8´30´´
Florencia Levy (Argentina) | Paisaje para una persona, 2014, 8´16´´

11:15 pm | Jorge de La Ferla program

IBERO-AMERICAN AUDIOVISUAL TERRITORIES

Running time: 60’

This selection of videos from Latin America, made for FUSO 2017, is linked to the Past and Present events of Lisbon Ibero-American Capital of Culture. The program proposes a brief tour of the continent’s audiovisual production. Based on works created in the first two decades of the third millennium, the chosen videos expose various readings of historical, social and political contexts in representations marked by the post specificity of the technological arts and their relations to the moving image in cinema and in video in combination with the digital image. The standardization of the spectacle at a global level leads us to think about old issues regarding authorship as well as about the artistic work and its reenactment in reading a Latin American context.
The gradual closure of the Bravo River north boundaries is linked to the displacement between regions and nations in the south of the continent where the cyclical process between populist and liberal governments goes hand in hand with a pseudo globalization. The imposition of seemingly open economies has ended the national industrial production and affirmed the role of the region as a reserve and raw material production area. The resistance that existed in the twentieth century ended up turning into, in the best case, a mere rhetorical resource as a support for an increasingly unfair distribution of wealth for a political spectrum in which corruption is the common good of all the rulling administrations. This political conjuncture is sustained in the mass media and in the audiovisual arts of the spectacle, as well as in a market linked to the local and global power system. This situation is strengthened in the media’s ideological apparatuses concentrated in a few corporations that dominate the audiovisual space and shape the consensusal norms of the citizen viewers. The standardization of these cinematic, televisual and telematic messages based on entertainment proposes an inefficient, unconvincing discourse.
This program presents other conceptual lines that originate historically from contemporary art, experimental cinema, video art and multimedia and create a diversity of discourses far away from those of the actual mainstream Latin American feature films industry.
Some of these works respond to a major trend that is the use of photographic, cinematographic, televisual and digital archival material. The Act of Diego Lama, presents an image of the Chamber of Deputies of Peru which is intervened with a dissolve that reverses its media image with a journalistic image. In Familiar by Paz Encina the archives of the dictatorship of General Stroessner are processed by exposing the indiscriminate persecutory system of a recent past; Caja Negra (Black Box) by Gerardo Suter uses images of dubious origin that circulate in the network documenting paths of silhouettes crossing borders; Once de Septiembre (September Eleven) by Claudia Aravena confronts media memories from television broadcasts of images of the military coup in Chile and those of September 11, 2001 in Manhattan that happened in the same day of the year; Paisaje para una persona (Landscape for a person) by Florence Levy reconstitutes a story based on virtual images that refer us to the vestiges of a globalized world through branded software that imposes an apparent vision of the real. In all cases, the artist’s work reformulates a discourse based on the politics of archives that disarticulate the original function of the images, in a new interpretation for a diverse reading of conflicts and injustices.
The second set offers seemingly poetic visions although unmasking cultural, personal and urban conflicts, Como Hacer Llover (How to Make it Rain) by Edgar Endress retakes the problematics of the original ethnicities in beliefs and rites linked to the Andean culture, essence of the true identity of a country linked to the cult of nature. Uyuni de Andrés Denegri reconsiders the environment of the plateau, in which the cadence of the film and the frame of the video bring an estrangement to the act of seeing. Tensa Calma by Alfredo Salomón takes place in the surroundings of an urban location; in one of the rooms of a house takes place a performance in which the body and the firearm merge in a parody of uncontrolled violence.
This brief sample of works and authors is characterized by an ethics of audiovisual experimentation for the representation of a complex Latin American environment far away from any normative spectacle; proposing other visions in the act of seeing and narrating through a camera and through a structure that is inscribed as a definitive script in the delicate process of post production.

Jorge La Ferla, 2017

Jardim do Museu Nacional de História Natural e da Ciência

Saturday, 26/8

11:15 pmPrograma Jorge La Ferla

IBERO-AMERICAN AUDIOVISUAL TERRITORIES

Edgar Endress (Chile) | Como hacer llover, 10´
Andrés Denegri (Argentina) | Uyuni, 2008, 8´18´´
Diego Lama (Peru) | The Act, 2012, 3´36´´
Claudia Aravena Abughosh (Chile) | Once de septiembre, 2002, 5´30´´
Alfredo Salomón (México) | Tensa Calma, 2008, 8´31´´
María Paz Encina (Paraguai) | Familiar, 2014. 9´
Gerardo Suter (Argentina/México) | Caja Negra, 2017, 8´30´´
Florencia Levy (Argentina) | Paisaje para una persona, 2014, 8´16´´

JORGE LA FERLA
(Argentina)

Researcher in Audiovisual Media. He has curated shows and exhibitions of film, video, multimedia and installations in America, Europe and the Middle East. He is currently working as a curator of the one person shows of José Alejandro Restrepo (Colombia) in Buenos Aires and of Gerardo Suter (Mexico) and Gilberto Prado (Brazil) at the Laboratorio de Arte Alameda in Mexico City. He has edited more than 35 books on audiovisual arts in Argentina, Brazil and Colombia and published dozens of texts in international publications. His last book is Cinema (and) digital, Ed. Manantial, 2009. He is professor of the University of Cinema and Department Chair of the University of Buenos Aires and has developed diverse academic activities in American and European universities.