Emília Tavares program | THE CLASS OF THE EXTINCT PEOPLES

Pedro Barateiro (Portugal) | Identidade em construção, 2006, 1’45’’
Maria Ruído (Espanha) | Lo que no puede ser visto debe ser mostrado, 2010, 12’
Vasco Araújo (Portugal) | Parque temático, 2016, 8’44’’
Ângela Ferreira (Moçambique/Portugal) | Joal la Portugaise, 2004, 6’15’’
Pilar Albarracin (Espanha) | Musical Dancing Spanish Dolls, 2001, 3’ 25’’
Valeriano López (Espanha) | Me duele el chocho, 2002, 3’34’’
Mauro Cerqueira (Portugal) | Leonel, 2015, 3’06’’
Lois Patiño (Espanha) | Noite sem distância, 2015, 23’

11:15pm | Programa EMÍLIA TAVARES

THE CLASS OF THE EXTINCT PEOPLES

Running time: 62

In 1869, Antero de Quental analyzed Portugal as belonging to a class of extinct peoples, stating that the dogma of nationality was forged against federalism and diverse identities, thus defending a spiritual Iberism as a guarantee of a truly democratic and popular experience.

The utopia of the Vencidos da Vida generation gave way to the dawn of a new century in which Portugal expelled the best of its culture and art to impose obscurantism with very long repercussions. For its part, the recent collapse of a Europe of plurality and solidarity also redirects the geo-strategy of collective dreams and compels us to rescue from history some of its most ambitious utopias.

Based on this historical horizon, a program was drawn up to establish an encounter between Portuguese and Spanish artists who, through their work, have observed and worked on their respective Histories, in their role of building discourses of power and national identity.

The works presented question some of the political foundations of this identity, as well as its historical legitimation through dogmatic mechanisms. They also elaborate observations on the cultural and identity genesis, the heavy inheritance of the empires, the stereotypes of the South and the dissensions and traumas of each of the countries before their collective memory; Thus constituting works that address not only the historical becoming, but also the present, in their processes of normalization and massification.

Together, these works evoke a communion of interests and nonconformity; they unite, through art, the same demand for a more just, critical and informed society. They undo, therefore, the politically constructed differences, and can establish new dialogues.

Emília Tavares, 2017

Jardim do Museu Nacional de Arte Antiga

Friday, 25/8

11.15 pm | Emília Tavares program

THE CLASS OF THE EXTINCT PEOPLES

Pedro Barateiro (Portugal) | Identidade em construção, 2006, 1’45’’
Maria Ruído (Espanha) | Lo que no puede ser visto debe ser mostrado, 2010, 12’
Vasco Araújo (Portugal) | Parque temático, 2016, 8’44’’
Ângela Ferreira (Moçambique/Portugal) | Joal la Portugaise, 2004, 6’15’’
Pilar Albarracin (Espanha) | Musical Dancing Spanish Dolls, 2001, 3’ 25’’
Valeriano López (Espanha) | Me duele el chocho, 2002, 3’34’’
Mauro Cerqueira (Portugal) | Leonel, 2015, 3’06’’
Lois Patiño (Espanha) | Noite sem distância, 2015, 23’

EMÍLIA TAVARES
(Portugal)

Emília Tavares (b. 1964) in Lisbon, Portugal, where she lives and works. Emilia Tavares is a senior curator at the National Museum of Contemporary Art – Museu do Chiado, Lisbon, researcher and art critic. MA in Art History (Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities at New University of Lisbon). Principal domains of research, History of Portuguese Photography, Photography and Social and Politics domains. Portuguese invited researcher to the European project FOTOFO – The History of 20th Century European Photography. Tavares regularly publishes in newspapers, magazines and catalogues, and is author of many lectures in public art and educational institutions. As curator has organized many exhibitions in the field of the contemporary arts, photography and new media.